What is the benefit of being a Singapore PR (Permanent Residence) instead of an Expat?

According to the latest HSBC survey, Singapore have been ranked the number one (1) for best places for expats to live and work in for the fourth year in a row. In a HSBC Expat Explorer survey conducted by YouGov in 2018, Singapore is considered the best out of 30 other countries.

Offering competitive salaries while providing a multi-cultural environment is considered very attractive to many. More than that, Singapore’s strong education system also provides an excellent place for families with children to reside in. With that in mind, it is no surprise that there is progressive growth in the numbers of PR applicants every year.

For those that isn’t familiar with the benefits of PR status, we have prepared a list here to help you in your considerations should you be interested in obtaining the blue pass in Singapore.

  • Healthcare Subsidiary

Permanent residence enjoys subsidized healthcare at government hospitals and clinics. This includes any routine appointments for checkout or even if you are nursing a regular cough or fever. The subsided rate can often mean that the price is 30% to 50% cheaper for Singapore permanent residence than expatriates/foreigner. Multiply the savings by the amount of family member you have, and the figure does add up to become quite substantial.

  • Child’s Education Cost

Likewise, for education, the cost is lower for children of PRs at government schools. This includes all government-run childcare, primary and secondary schools. When it comes to enrolment in to your preferred schools, children of PRs also stand a higher chance to get their preferred choice.

  • Residing in Singapore

The different work passes and permits usually last 2 to 3 years which is much shorter than PR status. Permanent residence can stay in the country for as long as 5 years. On top of that, they can freely enter of leave the country without major restrictions.

  • Eligible for Long-stay Visas for parents

Another great news for PRs is that their parents are Eligible for Long-stay Visas in Singapore. This means more family time while for you and your family while you enjoy your employment in Singapore.

  • Access to Public Housing (resale)

In Singapore, Public Housing is managed by the Housing and Development Board (HDB). While there are many factors and schemes governing it, being a PRs means you are eligible to purchase resale flats in Singapore. This could mean much lower cost of living, bringing you and your family higher disposable income and savings in the long-term.

The above 5 benefits are probably the most attractive reasons to become a Singapore PR. Compared to be an expatriate, it gets more affordable and easier to live in Singapore comfortable with the PR status. Having said that, there are indeed some factors for maintaining your expat status. For most individuals, the benefits surely outweigh the disadvantages by a fair margin. If you interested to know more, feel free to consult with any of our expert consultants who are specialist with many years of experience in this subject.

The 6 Benefits of Getting a Singapore Permanent Residence

Subsidy at Polyclinic and Public Hospitals

Ability to Retire in Singapore

Children of (SPR) Have a higher chance of entering a local mainstream school

Immigration Stability

Business & Employment Privileges

Housing & Real Estate Privileges

Evaluate Your Singapore PR Chance Here

Permanent Resident Application FAQ

Permanent residency in Singapore is the second most privileged immigration status in Singapore, second only to Singapore Citizenship. Being a permanent resident in Singapore means that you and your family can live, work, and buy property at a lower tax rate in the country. You will be treated as a part of the local community, eligible to various benefits such as travelling in and out of the country without restrictions.

Your school-going children will also have priority access to Singapore’s esteemed public education system. At work, your employer will be required to make monthly contributions to a compulsory pension scheme in your behalf. You will no longer have to acquire a new work visa every time you transfer jobs.

While being a Singapore PR gives you plenty of benefits and rights, the government will also have the power to enforce certain responsibilities upon you. One of which is military service, something that your sons (if they are also PR’s) are required to partake of once they reach the age of 18.

In order to be eligible for application of PR, you must fall under one of the following categories:

  • S Pass, Employment Pass, Personalised Employment Pass, and Entrepreneur Pass holders. (For Professionals, Skilled worker & Technical personal)

  • Spouse of a Singapore citizen or SPR

  • Child of a SC or PR who is unmarried and aged under 21

  • Aged parents of a Singapore citizen

  • Student Pass holders. They must have resided in Singapore for at least 2 years. They must also have passed at least 1 national exam (i.e. PSLE or GCE ‘N’/’O’/’A’ levels) or are in the Integrated Programme

Your school-going children will also have priority access to Singapore’s esteemed public education system. At work, your employer will be required to make monthly contributions to a compulsory pension scheme in your behalf. You will no longer have to acquire a new work visa every time you transfer jobs.

While being a Singapore PR gives you plenty of benefits and rights, the government will also have the power to enforce certain responsibilities upon you. One of which is military service, something that your sons (if they are also PR’s) are required to partake of once they reach the age of 18.

Yes, but you will need to apply for a re-entry permit. This permit will be valid for five years. We usually advise our adult working clients that for the first 2 years, they can do whatever they wish; but for the last 3 years, it would be best to stay and work in Singapore so that they can pay income tax and show to Singaporetheir contribution. If you have no choice and are sent out of Singapore for work by your company or students whom had went overseas to further studies, the ICA might ask you to explain your situation when it is time for your renewal.

Your school-going children will also have priority access to Singapore’s esteemed public education system. At work, your employer will be required to make monthly contributions to a compulsory pension scheme in your behalf. You will no longer have to acquire a new work visa every time you transfer jobs.

While being a Singapore PR gives you plenty of benefits and rights, the government will also have the power to enforce certain responsibilities upon you. One of which is military service, something that your sons (if they are also PR’s) are required to partake of once they reach the age of 18.

We had only seen renewals get rejected when the client did not stay in Singapore for a significant amount of time after being granted PR status. The government approves applications because they believe in the individual’s long-term commitment to the country, which is why it is called “permanent residence.” But if you are always staying in Singapore and fulfilling your contributions, then it is highly unlikely that you will get rejected.

Your school-going children will also have priority access to Singapore’s esteemed public education system. At work, your employer will be required to make monthly contributions to a compulsory pension scheme in your behalf. You will no longer have to acquire a new work visa every time you transfer jobs.

While being a Singapore PR gives you plenty of benefits and rights, the government will also have the power to enforce certain responsibilities upon you. One of which is military service, something that your sons (if they are also PR’s) are required to partake of once they reach the age of 18.

The ICA considers the fact that some employers are unwilling to provide the Annex A document as their employees might leave them after being granted their PR. Try to convince your company, as it may increase your chances. However, don’t worry if they really don’t want to provide you with the document. The purpose of showing the Annex A is to prove that you are part of the company, which you can also do through other documents like pay slips and such.

Your school-going children will also have priority access to Singapore’s esteemed public education system. At work, your employer will be required to make monthly contributions to a compulsory pension scheme in your behalf. You will no longer have to acquire a new work visa every time you transfer jobs.

While being a Singapore PR gives you plenty of benefits and rights, the government will also have the power to enforce certain responsibilities upon you. One of which is military service, something that your sons (if they are also PR’s) are required to partake of once they reach the age of 18.

If you lose any of your compulsory documents, you will have to provide a declaration letter to explain your situation. We offer the service of drafting such letters.

Rest assured that ICA officials go through all of your documents in a fair manner.

The quota is confidential and adjusted periodically.

There are many benefits to being a PR, one of which is the affordable housing due to the lower stamp duty. A PR pays half the stamp duty compared to that of a foreigner, while a Citizen pays less than half of what a PR pays. Naturally, a PR would be able to buy a HDB flat after three years, supposing the income does not exceed a certain amount. Another great perk is job stability. Employers generally prefer hiring a local (PR or Citizen) as it saves them the trouble of getting work passes. In addition, having more locals in the team means having a higher quota for hiring foreigners.

You also get access to cheaper medical services and public education for you and your children as a PR.

Lastly, there is the Central Provident Fund (CPF). The CPF acts like a retirement plan so that you can feel secure as you get older. You can use the CPF to pay for medical expenses, housing, and even investments. The companies that you become affiliated with are required to contribute to your CPF based on a percentage of your salary. This can seem negative to some people, as a portion of their income is automatically withheld and saved for future use. You will not have access to your CPF until the age of 52. Should you wish to leave and renounce your PR, you will be able to withdraw the full sum of your CPF.

One of the disadvantages might be If you are currently on an expat package, your company could adjust your salary package into local terms, which means you will no longer have added benefits such as housing and/or car allowance.

In general, we believe that there are still more advantages to being a PR than there are disadvantages. Ultimately, the choice is yours. We only wish to guide you in the best way that we can, using our years of expertise in the industry

First and foremost, you will enjoy the benefits and entitlements of a Citizen (E.g stamp duty, taxation)

Secondly, you do not need to worry about renewing your Re-Entry Permit

Thirdly, you will be able to travel the world with one of the most powerful passport of the world without visa for most of the countries.

The list goes on and on…

We would recommend to applying together as to show ICA that you and your family have the commitment level to stay in Singapore.

Under the Enlistment Act, all male Singapore Citizens and Permanent Residents, unless exempted, are liable to register for National Service (NS). Following the completion of full-time NS, they will be required to serve up to 40 days of Operationally Ready National Service (ORNS) per year for the duration of their ORNS training cycle, till the age of 50 years (for officers) or 40 years (for other ranks).

Main applicants who are granted PR status under the Professionals/Technical Personnel and Skilled Workers Scheme or the Investor Scheme, are exempted from NS.

Male applicants who are granted PR status as a Foreign Student or under their parents’ sponsorship are liable for NS under the Enlistment Act. They are required to register for NS upon reaching 16½ years old and will be scheduled for enlistment at the earliest opportunity upon reaching 18 years old. If they are pursuing full-time studies, deferment from full-time NS may be granted only if they meet the deferment conditions stipulated by the Ministry of Defence, which can be found at https://www.ns.sg. All NS-liable males aged 13 years old and above, are required to obtain an Exit Permit (EP) when travelling overseas for three months or more.

NS-liable PRs are expected to serve NS. Renouncing or losing one’s PR status without serving or completing full-time NS would have an adverse impact on any immediate or future applications to work or study in Singapore, or for Singapore citizenship or PR status. Renouncing or losing one’s PR status without serving or completing full-time NS may also adversely affect any immediate or future applications for renewal of Re-entry Permits made by one’s family members or sponsors.

Your school-going children will also have priority access to Singapore’s esteemed public education system. At work, your employer will be required to make monthly contributions to a compulsory pension scheme in your behalf. You will no longer have to acquire a new work visa every time you transfer jobs.

While being a Singapore PR gives you plenty of benefits and rights, the government will also have the power to enforce certain responsibilities upon you. One of which is military service, something that your sons (if they are also PR’s) are required to partake of once they reach the age of 18.

Second-generation PRs who renounce their PR status without serving NS will face adverse consequences. Their failure to serve NS will be taken into account should they attempt to apply to return to Singapore to study or work.

PR’s under the Professionals/Technical Personnel and Skilled Workers (PTS) Scheme or Global Investor Scheme are exempted from the NS. Male children who are granted PR status under their parents’ sponsorship are liable for NS under the Enlistment Act.

Deferment is usually granted for those who pursue tertiary education. However, most eligible males are still expected to serve the nation before attending university. You will be free to write a letter asking for further deferment, but its acceptance is at the discretion of the Ministry of Defence.

That is not necessary. As long as you are eligible to apply for PR, you should go for it as soon as possible.

Your parents can only be your sponsor if you’re below 21 years of age. If you are past 21, you will have to apply on your own merits.

If you only have a Work Permit, you will not be eligible to apply for Singapore Citizenship /Permanent Residence. The basic requirement is that you should have an S Pass to apply. Once you are an S Pass holder, the fact that your parents are locals will give you an edge over the rest, but you will still have to apply for Citizen/PR status on your own merits if you are over 21.

Your company will have to apply for the pass on your behalf. It depends on the company’s quota and the basic salary you are getting. Please kindly speak to our affiliated company for more information; Mason & Co Pte Ltd (www.masonac.com)

It all depends on where you studied. If you went to a local school (NUS, SMU, NTU, SP, NP, TP, RP, NYP, etc.), you will have an edge over other applicants, as the ICA officials will take it to mean that you were able to successfully integrate with the local community. Having attended international schools or private institutes will not be as advantageous.

It will not affect your chances, as long as you generally don’t switch jobs that often. The important thing is for the ICA to view you as a stable and responsible candidate.

Before changing jobs/companies, we suggest that you contact them via ica_pr@ica.gov.sg.

You may also choose to go down to their office personally. Provide them with:

  • A letter explaining your current situation

  • A copy of your new work pass

  • Passport biometric page copy

  • Annex A from new employer

If your application is successful, you will need to pay the following fees for each applicant:

  • S$100 for Entry Permit (for PR applications submitted before 18 December 2017)
  • S$20 for Entry Permit (for PR applications submitted from 18 December 2017 onwards)
  • S$50 for a 5-year Re-Entry Permit
  • S$50 for Identity Card
  • S$30 per Entry Visa (foreigners requiring a visa).

The above fees are payable via NETS or CashCard.

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CONTACT US

For any inquiries, questions or commendations, please call: (65) 6970 1392 or complete the form above.

(Only 4 minutes walk away from ICA)
2 Kallang Ave, CT Hub, #09-10 Singapore 339407 (By appointment only)